Wald #18 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #1 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #9 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #122 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #19 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #44 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #128 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #117 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #143 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ Ilfochrome
Wald #215 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ silver gelatin
Wald #164 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ silver gelatin
Wald #213 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ silver gelatin
Wald #214 – pinhole photograph on 10″ x 8″ silver gelatin

Wald are unique 10″x8″ pinhole photographs of the trees and woods surrounding my home and studio. The photographic paper was placed inside of the 10″x8″ pinhole camera and exposed from 30 minutes to 6 hours. The color images are on Ilfochrome paper and the B&W prints are on Oriental Seagull fiber based paper. The camera was handmade by photographer Amos Chan and was placed in the woods on a sturdy tripod. The camera had a sign asking passers-by not to disturb it. I left the camera, set a timer on my watch and came back when I estimated the exposure was correct. I would shoot 30 color images before processing them because the Ilfochrome processor worked best in batches. Sometimes 2 weeks of shooting went by before I found out if the exposures were correct and if I had any images. Because the exposures were so long often the sun would track through the image, the trees would blow in the wind, but any part of the tree that didn’t move would be in focus thanks to the extreme depth of field characteristic of pinhole photography.

The word “Wald” means “forest in German. The inspiration for the series was to capture the view when awakening from a nap under a tree. Or maybe what one might dream when napping under the tree.

Wald pinhole camera in the woods
Wald pinhole camera in the woods – the black piece of tape is the “shutter.” The camera uses a standard 8″x10″ film holder.