Projects tagged with ''wet-plate collodion''

Manual Project Books

Manual interior page

MANUAL: The Personalities of Hands is a book of portraits with a twist: personal stories and private secrets told through images of hands. Readers witness the diverse range of humanity through photographs and photograms of hands rather than traditional pictures of faces. The photographs also make up a fine art exhibition. Bill Westheimer has captured …

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Anthropocene

Anthropocene

2019 - Ongoing

Collodion Wet-plate collodion photogram on stone, stand made of welded steel and rock - 3.5"x5" up to 8"x8" not including stand

The “Anthropocene” fossils are imaginary records of flora and fauna that might be found in a future geologic era. They are evidence of what was and hints of how it might have been extinguished. Just as the real fossils found by humans fill in the story of what lived and how it died in earlier geologic era, these created fossils are evidence what what might be becoming extinct as a result of human activity.

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Propagation and Maple Seed Collodion

2003

Ilfochrome Photograms (Propagation) and Wet-Plate Collodion photograms on glass (Maple Seeds) Color images are 10"x8", Black and White are 5.5"x4.25"

Maple Seed and Propagation are photograms of maple seeds. The black and white photograms are made on collodion wet-plate glass negatives. The Propagation series images are made on Ilfochrome paper.

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Pythagoras

2016

Wet-Plate Collodion on Laser etched Trophy Aluminum (Tintype) 6"x8" or 6"x6" or 4.25"x5.5"

After 35 years of making photograms I felt challenged to make something new, but it seemed I had photogrammed every kind of object. I decided to create my own objects to make photograms with - and the best place to start is with simple geometric shapes.  I 3D printed geometric shapes which were placed on the wet tintype and exposed to light. Before making the photogram I laser-etched photographs of the geometric objects onto the aluminum to achieve a layered effect. I was able to produce new imagery of timeless shapes using 19th century analog process combined with 21st century laser etching and 3D printing.

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Tintype Portrait of Nick

2012

Eleven collodion wet plate portraits made with color anodized aluminum mounted in a carefully spaced overlapping pattern standing off the black velvet background in a 18.5″ x 22.5″ frame

Eleven collodion wet plate portraits made with color anodized aluminum. The strobe light was so bright I didn’t want to photograph innocent subjects who might not be careful enough to avoid looking at the 5000 watt seconds of lights when they flashed. So I used the only subject who I trusted - my assistant Nick.

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Tintype Self-Portraits

2012

Thirty 3"x3" collodion wet-plate self-portrait photographs on color anodized trophy aluminum spaced 1/4" apart and standing 3/4" off the black background in a 21" x 24" frame.

Thirty collodion wet plate self portraits made with color anodized aluminum. The strobe light was so bright I didn't want to photograph innocent subjects who might not be careful enough to avoid looking at the 5000 watt seconds of lights when they flashed. So I used the only subject who is patient enough to sit for 30 portraits. The process required 3 days to complete all 30 plates.

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Clematis

2003-2005

The unique (edition of 1) collodion wet-plate glass negatives are 4.25"x5.5" and can be contact printed as salted paper prints or silver gelatin prints. All images have been scanned and are available as limited edition digital pigment print enlargements up to 40"x50".

Clematis is a climbing vine with gorgeous flowers. These photograms are of the flower after the bloom has wilted, lost its petals, and gone to seed. The clematis flowers are placed in the enlarger and projected onto a collodion wet-plate glass plate.

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Blog posts tagged with ''wet-plate collodion''

Tag: wet-plate collodion

An early photographic process. The collodion process, mostly synonymous with the “collodion wet plate process”, requires the photographic material to be coated, sensitized, exposed and developed within the span of about fifteen minutes, necessitating a darkroom for use in the field. The collodion process is said to have been invented in 1851. During the subsequent decades, many photographers and experimenters refined or varied the process. It was most commonly used from the 1860s to 1880’s it replaced the first announced photographic process, the daguerreotype. One collodion process, the tintype, was in limited use for casual portraiture by some itinerant and amusement park photographers as late as the 1930s.